Tag Archives: food

OceanGybe – Webisode – 11 – Ayam Makan "Chicken Meal" – Indonesia

After surfing epic, Indonesian perfection all day, the OceanGybe boys are hungry for more than waves and head to the local market for dinner supplies. “Kami mau dua ayam banyak, saya potong” translated from Bahasa Indonesian into English literally means, “We would like two big chickens, we will kill them”, but when you order a chicken in Indonesia, it arrives warm, feathered and definitely clucking.

WARNING: If you are squeamish (like Bryson…see him gag @ 06:48), a vegetarian or from PETA, please be advised, chickens are killed in this video and you might not want to watch. Plus there is some great surf!

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OceanGybe – Webisode 09 – Garbage Study – Vanuatu

With exception to the plastic trash throughout high tide lines, the Rowa Islands of Vanuatu are paradise. With Khulula at anchor near an uninhabited beach, the crew of OceanGybe conduct yet another garbage study. This webisode is brought to you by KING Bleach.

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Fishing at sea

Needle in a haystack

If you’re a regular reader of our blogs you’ll definitely be familiar with our fishing exploits and the Mahi Mahi (aka Dorado); it’s one of our favourite fish to catch (read: eat). We recently had a remarkable encounter with 2 of these beautiful fish.
Before setting out into the pacific almost 2 years ago, my fishing experience consisted only of coastal fishing around BC for salmon, cod, dock perch, and the like. Fishing and finding fish was done using features of the ocean floor and coastline: drop offs, pools, points, kelp, river mouths. That you could find life, in abundance, thousands of miles from land in water kilometers deep was astounding, even unbelievable. Continue reading

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Gastronomical delights

by Steph

In Indonesia, there are no typical local grocery stores in the small towns and villages as there are in North America, and to get groceries, one can’t just cruise the strip, get what you need and go. We have relied on locals in each location to assist us in obtaining staples such as eggs and flour. Continue reading

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"Kami mau dua ayam banyak, saya potong"

We would like two big chickens, we will kill them…

The vast list of provisions unattainable in Indonesia is topped by two ingredients very dear to the hearts of the Khulula crew: Fresh meat and fresh bread…

Well, that isn’t entirely true, as the latter can be found in a highly processed, VERY sweet format that will leave one feeling as if they have consumed 15 doughnuts back to back. Continue reading

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Feast or Famine on the way to Indonesia

I can hardly move, the aching from my bulging stomach continues to hamper my movements, just moving to the computer to type this quick blog was an effort. We are all stuffed; we have eaten way too much. And it has been about 4 hours since we last ate. Hugh is splayed in his bunk, belly up. Ryan is lying under the sunshade in the cockpit trying to mentally clear his stomach. Whatever could have happened to get us into this situation? Continue reading

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Wind, due South, day after day – crew morale saved by dry veggies!

FACT:
1)Beating into the wind sucks, no two ways about it.
2)Beating into 25 knots of winds, into short choppy seas sucks even more.
3)Beating into 25kts of wind, in short choppy seas, while shipping salt water into the boat via the anchor locker and having to sponge put the bilges every two hours is on an even higher level of suck.

Add to this the fact that EVERYTHING on the boat got SOAKED (before we found where the water was coming from) in sea water three days ago, and also that due to our point of sail we can’t open any of the hatches to air it all out, and you have a very uncomfortable cabin. It must be 35 degrees inside the cabin, moist, musty and starting to get mouldy. As soon as we open a hatch, we take a wave over the boat and soak one of our cushions or sheets or pillowcases even more than it already is. We are remaining positive though, because things could definitely be worse: We could be sitting with NO WIND, and no DIESEL (seeing as we had to use all it to avoid a Tropical Cyclone) in the Doldrums (where we are) for days. Also, we have a reprieve in sight: The further south we get, the weaker the grip that the ITCZ has on the Southern Hemi SE trade winds. This ITCZ is such a massive low pressure area that even something as set in as the southern hemisphere trade winds get sucked north. Escaping the ITCZ is an uphill, upwind battle, totally like swimming against the current to reach the blissful calm of a nice swimming hole upstream. As we get further away from Mr ITCZ, we should get more and more easterly direction in our wind, which translates to the wind coming from behind us, open hatches, air flow, double the boat speed and no more SLAMMING into waves. BRING IT ON!

Over the past few days we have delved into the feast that Mr. Neil Heidstra put together for us. Neil, an avid hiker and outdoor guy, built himself a food dehydrator a few years ago, and has clearly perfected the art. We have dedicated an entire ice box (Neil’s Locker) to these dried foods and every day try out new one of his marvelous feats! Up until this point we have been eating all the perishables on the boat, so it is only recently that we have come to realise what a GOLDMINE we have been sitting on! Neil, if you are reading this, THANK YOU SO MUCH for this amazing array of eats! Carrots, Brussel Sprouts, Broccoli, Mushrooms, Tuna, Ground Beef, Shrimp, Lemon Slices, Green, Red and Yellow Peppers, Tomato Flakes, Eggs, etc etc etc. After not seeing land for almost two weeks, watching these veggies reconstitute themselves brings MUCH more anticipation that any television show (yes, even 24)! Imagine eating a chicken stirfry with green, red and yellow peppers, sautéed with mushrooms and chopped peanuts, and served on a bed of rice and spinach… Are you on the set of the Iron Chef? Nay, this is the average dinner about sailing Vessel Khulula (Charlie Foxtrot Gulf Seven Four Four Three) thanks to the amazing effort of Neil. Diana Robertson also deserves a huge mention here, for smuggling this not-so-small and highly dodgy package across the Mexican border! What did your customs card look like mom?!

OK, I am off outside to see if I can catch a fish. Wouldn’t want to get Keel Hauled, I hear that is a pretty unpleasant experience. What Bryson didn’t mention in his blog is that my line DID actually catch a couple of fish last week, one of which Bryson towed all of his night shift without realizing it was on there. The next morning, all that was left was a well bitten lure that had been grinded upon to the point that there were no barbs left on the hook, and it was not sharp at all. There have to be tuna around here though, considering that we passed within 2nm of a Tuna fishing ship last night. It was was great to see some other human life, and have a quick chat to the night watchman over the radio! We really need to get out boat speed above 4kts to get up to Tuna speed though, so this feast is also waiting for our wind shift…

SO here is to hoping that our next blog will be written while sailing downwind, and with bellies filled with fresh Bluefin tuna!

Ryan

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