Tag Archives: garbage

OceanGybe – Webisode 09 – Garbage Study – Vanuatu

With exception to the plastic trash throughout high tide lines, the Rowa Islands of Vanuatu are paradise. With Khulula at anchor near an uninhabited beach, the crew of OceanGybe conduct yet another garbage study. This webisode is brought to you by KING Bleach.

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OceanGybe – Webisode – 08 – The Legend of Yasur

As Khulula and her crew approach the archipelago of Vanuatu after a week at sea, they spot a smoking volcano, known as Yasur, on the island of Tanna. Mount Yasur is one of the world’s most active volcanos and the crew take a tour to investigate closer.

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Study: Hesquiat Peninsula, Vancouver Island, Canada

Download the results of our Garbage Study here… (pdf)

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Shocked by garbage

Well, the wind has been down all day and the seas quite calm so, despite being far south of the gyre, we decided to try out our borrowed Algulita Foundation garbage manta trawl. Just to see if we could get the deployment figured out and see if there were any changes that needed to be made in order to get it to work off ol’ Khulula. Continue reading

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Standardizing the Standard, the UN joins the fight

Recently, the OceanGybe crew was forwarded a series of e-mails by incredibly dedicated Fabiano Barretto of Global Garbage. OceanGybe started working with the Global Garbage team while we were in Fernando de Noronha, Brazil, evaluating the evidence of African refuse on the Brazilian coastline. Global Garbage is group of incredible devoted and driven individuals who maintain globalgarbage.org, a website whose objective is bring the actions, initiatives, activities and projects of the Global Garbage Team out to the greater public and also help to bring more awareness to the global phenomenon of the marine trash. On their website is a virtual plethora of publically available content on marine trash. Take the time to take a look. Continue reading

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More information on Plastics and our Oceans

Interested in garbage, recycling and our oceans ?

I am lying here on the coach recovering from ear surgery after surfing in cold Canadian waters for too long and have had time to search/surf the internet and have come across some incredible interesting articles/clips/newsreels with regards to ocean pollution and plastics. Continue reading

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Garbage, Garbage everywhere…

Frequent readers of our wandering – both geographically and mentally – blogs may be beginning to wonder if we are really doing any sort of studies on the plastic refuse concentrating on our beaches globally. Stories of interesting people, obscure historical references and exciting adventures continually arrive on the website, with only the odd vague reference to garbage, plastics and their destructive effects.

Critics could be excused for surmising that we are just sailing and surfing our way around the world but using a green/environmental/ecological message to try and attract attention to ourselves and maybe even secure a some free gear from our sponsors. Well, without some detailed exploration or our website, they would have ample evidence to prove their point. Yet those internet-savvy searchers would have found our page detailing our garbage studies up until South Africa. Continue reading

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Brazil, Soccer and Garbage

The ball goes long, 5 sets of barefooted feet approach it’s landing point from different directions, the quickest one is tackled and the ball bounces free, it is picked up and send back into the opponents half by the next arrival. The game has been going on for hours, with players substituting as others tire, but the pace of the game has never lessened. Sweat pores from the players, t-shirts are discarded and yelling for the ball is continuous. The game began on the sand flats exposed at low tide. A hard, smooth and expansive playing field to begin with, but the surface rapidly degraded into a pit-holed, uneven, ankle twisting dream. Slowly the tide is rising into the playing field and covering over the goal posts at each end. However, as each wave retreats a new area of perfectly flat sand provides the opportunity for a break-away goal, but is also bring another challenge to the game. Continue reading

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Video on the Great Pacific Gyre

Charles Moore is founder of the Algalita Marine Research Foundation. He captains the foundation’s research vessel, the Alguita, documenting the great expanses of plastic waste that now litter our oceans. He is the leading authority on the Great Pacific Gyre. Watch this video for a sobering summary of his work. For more information about the Gyre, go here. Thanks, and help keep our beaches clean!


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Cocos Keeling: Australian Paradise and Indonesia's Garbage Dump.

Cocos (Keeling) Islands group is an isolated cluster of islands approximately 2000 km due west of Bali, featuring two main atolls: South and North Keeling. The first recorded sighting was by Captain William Keeling of the East Indian Company in 1609, but remained uninhabited until Englishman William Hare arrived in 1825. Hare and John Clunies-Ross were the first two permanent residents of the islands, however due to conflicts between the two, Clunies-Ross was the only resident in 1831, when he was given possession of the atolls by the British Government. Continue reading

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